BALTIMORE AND OHIO RAILROAD MUSEUM

This page is part of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Network web site and is not affiliated with the B&O Museum.

Click here to go to the official museum site.

These first five shots were taken around 1988. A note for photographers, the museum does move things around now and then so take your camera even if you've visited before. Also, the locomotives on display outside face east so you should arrive early for the best light (the first five pictures were taken in the afternoon). There will also be fewer cars in the parking lot to get into your shots.

B&O Museum 

President Washington, B&O Number 5300, 4-6-2 Pacific

B&O Museum

C&O Number 490, 4-6-4 Hudson

B&O Museum

B&O Museum

PRR Number 4890, GG-1

B&O Museum

B&O Number 5605, GP-7

The following pictures were taken in October, 2008.

B&O Museum

C&O Number 1309, Class H-6 2-6-6-2

B&O Museum

B&O Number, RDC-2

B&O Museum

C&O Number 2705, 2-8-4

B&O Museum

Western Maryland Number 81, BL-2

B&O Museum

Museum Roundhouse

B&O Museum

B&O Number CE-15

B&O Museum

B&O Number C-1775

B&O Museum

CNJ Number 1000

B&O Museum

GC&E 3-Truck Shay Number 1

B&O Museum 

B&O Number C-3808

B&O Museum

REAX Number 7018, Reefer Car

B&O Museum

B&O Number C-2222

B&O Museum

Camden Station on the new HO layout

B&O Museum

Point of Rocks Station on the new HO layout

Below are some (rather bad) photographs of the old HO scale layout that was located on the second story of the museum. (You should have seen what these pictures looked like before all of the cropping and color correction!)

The layout was first shown to the public in August, 1955, just in time for the NMRA National Convention that was held in Baltimore that year. I first saw it sometime time in 1964 during my first visit to the museum. I was only seven at the time and had never seen a model railroad that big. To say that it had a big impact on me would be an understatement. I saw the layout again another five or six times before it was dismantled a few years ago.

The layout was a basically a double-track folded dog bone cleverly disguised by the various tunnels and mountain ranges. It was divided into three sections. On the north end there was a fairly large town complete with business, residential and industrial areas. The center section depicted the B&O lines in the Potomac Valley including the railroad's Magnolia Cutoff which was used as a fast freight line. On the south end there was a large yard for freight and passenger cars along with a complete engine facility which included an operating turntable.

The railroad lasted for about fifty years. I'm sorry that it's gone.

B&O Museum

B&O Museum

B&O Museum

B&O Museum

B&O Museum

B&O Museum

B&O Museum

B&O Museum

B&O Museum

B&O Museum

Copyright 1999-2014 Scott Dunlap

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